REX HILL
 
June 7, 2018 | REX HILL

Rosemary Beef Tenderloin Skewers paired with the REX HILL Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

Rosemary Beef Tenderloin Skewers
Recommended Wine Pairing: REX HILL Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs beef tenderloin, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 8 strong rosemary branches
  • 1 tbsp minced fresh rosemary
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 tbsp lemon zest
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Warm pita
  • Crumbled feta (I recommend French sheep's milk feta)

Directions

  1. Strip rosemary leaves from branches. Reserve branches and mince 2 tbsp of rosemary.
  2. Combine rosemary with lemon zest, garlic, salt, pepper and olive oil. Stir together in a bowl and add beef. Cover and marinate 4 hours to overnight.
  3. Thread each skewer with 3-4 chunks of beef, leaving room between pieces to allow even browing. 
  4. Heat a heavy-bottomed pan to very hot and place 4 skewers at a time in the pan. Cook about 2 minutes on each side, until medium rare.
  5. Remove the beef from the skewers and serve in the warm pitas topped with feta.

 

 

Time Posted: Jun 7, 2018 at 4:03 PM
REX HILL
 
October 30, 2017 | REX HILL

REX HILL Wins Prestigious Robert Parker Wine Advocate Extraordinary Winery Award

Oregon’s REX HILL winery won the inaugural Wine Advocate Extraordinary Winery ‘Under the Radar’ Award at a ceremony held in conjunction with Michelin Guide in New York City last night, Monday, October 30th. The award recognizes the Willamette Valley winery as “poised to become the next-great-thing” in the Americas. Lisa Perotti-Brown and the editorial team of the Wine Advocate evaluated wineries throughout North and South America to make the selection.

REX HILL was purchased in 2007 by A to Z Wineworks. Two of A to Z’s founding winemaking partners, Cheryl Francis and Sam Tannahill, and Executive Winemaker, Michael Davies, reduced REX HILL’s production by roughly 80% to refocus on wines only of the highest quality. Today REX HILL wines compose just 3% of A to Z’s total production, resulting in the ability to craft wines of singular focus and refinement. The winery’s estate vineyards are farmed using Biodynamic principles, including the flagship Jacob-Hart Vineyard.

Reflecting on ten years elevating the REX HILL brand, Tannahill says, “We are gratified for this recognition from The Wine Advocate affirming our strict pursuit of quality for one of the Willamette Valley’s legacy wineries. These are not wines we ‘have to’ make, they are wines we have the privilege of crafting. We are truly proud to be one of just eight wineries recognized from the entire Americas region in the first class of Wine Advocate honorees.”

About REX HILL:

REX HILL has been making elegant Pinot Noirs for over 35 years in the Willamette Valley at the gateway to Oregon's wine country. REX HILL honors exceptional single vineyards and continues a legacy of singular Pinot Noirs that reflect their origin.

REX HILL wines are 100% Willamette Valley
REX HILL Vineyards and Winery are LIVE certified
REX HILL is a certified B Corp

For further information contact:

REX HILL · 30835 N Hwy 99W · Newberg, Oregon USA 97132
Keith@REXHILL.com / 503.554.1918 ext. 226 / REXHILL.com

Time Posted: Oct 30, 2017 at 10:00 AM
REX HILL
 
October 23, 2017 | REX HILL

REX HILL Nominated for Prestigious Robert Parker Wine Advocate Extraordinary Winery Award

Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate and Michelin Guide will host their inaugural Extraordinary Winery Awards gala in New York City on October 30, 2017. Willamette Valley’s REX HILL is one of three nominees for the Under the Radar Winery Award, wineries that are “poised to become the next-great-thing.”

REX HILL was purchased in 2007 by A to Z Wineworks. Two of A to Z’s founding winemaking partners, Cheryl Francis and Sam Tannahill, and Executive Winemaker, Michael Davies, reduced REX HILL’s production by roughly 80% to refocus on wines only of the highest quality. Today REX HILL wines compose just 3% of A to Z’s total production, resulting in the ability to craft wines of singular focus and refinement. The winery’s estate vineyards are farmed using Biodynamic principles, including the flagship Jacob-Hart Vineyard.

The event will feature MICHELIN-starred chefs Daniel Boulud, Ken Frank, and Eric Ripert. Reflecting on ten years elevating the REX HILL brand, Tannahill says, “We are gratified for this recognition from The Wine Advocate affirming our strict pursuit of quality for one of the Willamette Valley’s legacy wineries. These are not wines we ‘have to’ make, they are wines we have the privilege of crafting.”

About REX HILL

REX HILL has been making elegant Pinot Noirs for over 35 years in the Willamette Valley at the gateway to Oregon's wine country. REX HILL honors exceptional single vineyards and continues a legacy of singular Pinot Noirs that reflect their origin.

REX HILL wines are 100% Willamette Valley
REX HILL Vineyards and Winery are LIVE certified
REX HILL is a certified B Corp

For further information contact:
REX HILL · 30835 N Hwy 99W · Newberg, Oregon USA 97132
Katie@REXHILL.com / 503.554.1918 ext. 226 / REXHILL.com

 

Time Posted: Oct 23, 2017 at 11:00 AM
Carrie Kalscheuer
 
September 13, 2017 | Carrie Kalscheuer

Oregon Chardonnay - One of the Most Exciting Developements in Wine Today

Chardonnay is one of the most widely-planted grapes in the world. Commonly known as “the winemaker’s grape” due to its ability to handle many different treatments in cellar, Chardonnay styles can range from fresh, vibrant, fruit-driven wines with bracing acidity and restrained alcohols in cooler regions to riper, richer styles showing tropical flavors, low acidity and high alcohols in warmer to hotter regions.  Although Chardonnay was originally from the Burgundy region in France, for years Chardonnay plantings in the U.S. were concentrated in California, ushering in a fashion of powerful Chardonnays with heavy oak, toast, sugars and high alcohols.

With a naturally low flavor profile, Chardonnay can act as a tabula rasa expressing the unique properties of the vineyard and region in which it is grown. Pinot Noir, with fewer anthocyanins than other red grapes, can serve a similar function.  For this reason, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay have been planted next to one another in cool climates for centuries. It was natural that the Oregon wine pioneers planted Chardonnay alongside Pinot Noir as far back as the late 1960s.  At that time, the available clonal material (cuttings that have adapted or been propagated to show different traits in different climates and soils) was almost exclusively the heat-treated, heat-adapted clone developed for late ripening in California. This warm climate clone resulted in a majority of opulent wines with heavy oak flavors and high alcohol and brought disappointing results in cool climate Oregon, where optimal ripening was only happening in the warmest of years.

Working with Oregon State University in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Oregon vintners brought into the country new clones of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from Burgundy. These so-called “Dijon Clones” were chosen for their ability to ripen in a cooler region, showcasing a delicate freshness and bright acidity. With this new range of clones, Oregon winemakers could more accurately choose the right vines for the right site (with some vineyards planted to “field blends” of many clones) giving winemakers different flavors and ripeness levels to work with at harvest.

As Americans began a love affair with fresh food, overly-manipulated, powerful Chardonnays were found too dominant compared to those more able to companionably accompany food.  These good partners, vibrant and exciting wines highlighting the natural expression of the grape and growing site, most often came from cool climate regions including Oregon’s lively expressions of Chardonnay.

Sitting between 42 and 47 degrees latitude, Oregon’s growing regions are perfectly suited for Pinot Noir and Chardonnay ripening. Long warm days followed by cool nights retain the vibrant acidity that makes Oregon Chardonnay a perfect food wine with a distinct ability to age in cellar.  Today, Oregon Chardonnay is on the rise, with recent plantings growing by over 13% in the last two years.  Styles can range from bright, linear, stainless-steel fermented wines to mineral-driven, neutral oak styles that show a great deal of depth and complexity. Both are ideal companions for food.

Two to try:

A to Z Wineworks Chardonnay
Fresh and lively, America's best-selling unoaked Oregon Chardonnay is full of citrus, quince and melon flavors offering all of the delights of food-friendly, cool climate whites. A to Z Wineworks Chardonnay shows all the intensity and depth of the vintage yet retains the purity and freshness that Oregon Chardonnay is known for.

REX HILL Willamette Valley “Seven Soils” Chardonnay 
Just a touch of oak graces this Willamette Valley Chardonnay, which is hand-picked and sorted. Rich and fruit-driven with a lovely acidity, this elegant expression of Chardonnay is built to please for many years.

Time Posted: Sep 13, 2017 at 2:52 PM
REX HILL
 
April 17, 2017 | REX HILL

Mushroom Risotto Recipe paired with our 2014 REX HILL Willamette Valley Pinot Noir

INGREDIENTS

7 cups mushroom or chicken stock

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 large shallot, minced

1 1/2 cups Arborio rice

1 lb. wild mushrooms (about 1/2 lb. shitake, remaining 1/2 lbs. any mix of maitake, chantrelle, morel or any seasonal wild mushroom), cleaned and torn into bite-size pieces

1/2 cup dry white wine (Chardonnay works well)

3 Tbsp butter

1 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Salt & ppepper to taste

1 sprig thyme or savory

 

DIRECTIONS

1. Bring stock to a simmer and keep warm.

2. Heat the oil in a heavy-bottoed saucepan and add shallots, stirring to cook until translucent. Add mushrooms, along with a pinch of salt and pepper, and sauté for about 5 minutes.

3. Add rice and thyme and stir frequently until it starts to smell slightly toasted, about 2 minutes. Add wine and stir until wine is cooked away. Add about 2 cups of the hot stock (enough to cover the rice) and stir until liquid is almost completely absorbed. Continue adding the stock in about a half cup at a time, cooking until the stock is absorbed each time, until the rice becomes tender but not falling apart. You should have about a half cup of warm stock left. Remove the sprig of thyme or savory.

4. Stir in butter and half of the parmesan. Add salt and pepper to taste. If the risotto is very thick, add in the remaining warm stock. Serve topped with the remaining parmesan and a glass of the 2014 REX HILL Willamette Valley Pinot Noir.

 

Time Posted: Apr 17, 2017 at 2:18 PM
Leanne Bellncula
 
July 21, 2016 | Leanne Bellncula

2013 REX HILL Willamette Valley Seven Soils Chardonnay paired with Lemon Chicken Breasts for the perfect summer dinner

I consider myself a foodie, but I am not a cook.  My husband is the chef in our house.  I am an amazing sous chef, salad maker, and dish cleaner.

However, when I do get inspired to cook, I am a total recipe-follower, and I look to my Food Network Hero for inspiration: Barefoot Contessa.  I love her recipes, because they are simple, elegant, and French-inspired.

One of my favorite Barefoot Contessa recipes is Lemon Chicken Breasts, and it pairs perfectly with one of my favorite wines, 2013 REX HILL Willamette Valley Seven Soils Chardonnay.  The zesty lemon and herbs on the chicken marry beautifully with the citrus and tropical notes of the wine.  Also, the subtle creaminess of the Chardonnay adds a depth to the meal that leaves your palate singing for more!  Bon appetite!

 

Lemon Chicken Breasts from Barefoot Contessa's "How Easy Is That?" Cookbook:

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup good olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons minced garlic (9 cloves)
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine (I of course used 2013 REX HILL Willamette Valley Seven Soils Chardonnay)
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest (2 lemons)
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme leaves
  • Kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 boneless chicken breasts, skin on (6-8 ounces each) - I typically use bone-in & skin-on breasts for more flavor.
  • 1 lemon

 

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Warm the olive oil in a small saucepan over medium-low heat, add the garlic, and cook for just 1 minute but don't allow the garlic to turn brown.  Off the heat, add the white wine, lemon zest, lemon juice, oregano, thyme, and 1 teaspoon salt and pour into a 9x12-inch baking dish.
  3. Pat the chicken breasts dry and place skin side up over the sauce.  Brush the chicken breasts with olive oil and sprinkle them liberally with salt and pepper.  Cut the lemon into 8 wedges and tuck it among the pieces of chicken.
  4. Bake for 30-40 minutes, depending on the size of the chicken breasts, until the chicken is done and the skin is lightly browned.  If the chicken isn't browned enough, put it under the broiler for 2 minutes.  Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil and allow to rest for 10 minutes.  Sprinkle with salt and serve hot with the pan juices.

Note: Don't forget to make plenty of rice, because you'll want to soak up all of the delicious lemony goodness of the pan juices. Yum!

Time Posted: Jul 21, 2016 at 4:00 PM
Tom Caruso
 
June 2, 2016 | Tom Caruso

Roast Chicken dinner with the 2013 REX HILL Jacob-Hart Estate Vineyard Pinot Noir

One of the most frequently asked questions that I receive in the Tasting Room is, “what is your favorite REX HILL wine?” And more often than not, my response will be a resounding, “It depends.” While one’s initial impression is that I’m playing it safe or don’t want to pick favorites, I proceed to explain that my view of wine mirrors that of my view of food—my favorite dish will typically be the one I’m most in the mood for. With that, it seems I have been dually tasked in choosing a favorite REX HILL wine and deciding what to pair it with.

Despite weather trending warmer and warmer here in the Willamette Valley, we’ve had a few chilly and rainy days thrust into the mix to remind us that it’s not quite summer. On those brisk evenings, I resort back to winter mode and crave something hearty – currently daydreaming about roasted chicken with some rosemary fingerling potatoes and a kale and cannellini bean couscous to round it out. My goodness, I’m starting to get hungry!

Having a dish in mind, it’s time to decide on the perfect pairing. A lot of different wines could go with this meal—red or white in color. In particular, even a lot of Pinot Noirs can go with this meal. After all, food and wine are made to go together! But to me there is one wine in particular that calls out: 2013 REX HILL Jacob-Hart Estate Vineyard Pinot Noir. It’s a wine that I love to explore in glass as it tends to move from a lifted dark cherry, raspberry, and violet floral/ fruit profile into more herbal and earthy components—playing very nicely with our dish of choice. There are a lot of complimentary flavors and aromatics going on here. Think of the smell of those rosemary potatoes wafting alongside fresh herbal aromas of the wine. Even more fun is the sensory experience on the palate. The mouth coating buttery texture of the cannellini bean couscous and protein from the chicken are whisked away by the fruit flavors, acidity, and whole cluster tannins of the wine. Perfection!

Time Posted: Jun 2, 2016 at 11:00 AM
Jonathan Lampe
 
May 25, 2016 | Jonathan Lampe

Homemade Margherita Pizza with the 2013 REX HILL Alpine Vineyard Pinot Noir

The first time I tried the 2013 REX HILL Alpine Vineyard Pinot Noir, I thought it would make an excellent companion to some Italian food. The Alpine has a note of bell pepper and tomato leaf that distinguishes it from the other single-vineyard bottlings REX HILL produced in 2013. It yearned to be coupled with a rich tomato sauce.

I opted for a homemade Margherita Pizza with fresh mozzarella, Roma tomatoes and fresh-picked basil. The pairing wasn’t a disappointment. While I’ll sometimes take the trouble to make my own pizza dough from scratch, I’m not above buying pizza dough from the store, or in a pinch, calling for delivery.

 

Homemade Margherita Pizza


Ingredients

500 grams all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon active dry yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons fine sea salt
350 grams lukewarm water

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl combine the flour, yeast, and salt. Add the water, and mix with your hand until the water is incorporated and a shaggy dough forms. The dough will be sticky, but don’t be afraid. Once the dough is incorporated, use your other hand to squeegee any excess dough off your hand and back into the bowl.
     
  2. Shape the dough into a ball and transfer to a clean large bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature in a draft-free place until the dough is doubled in size. This may take up to 18 hours, depending on how warm your kitchen is. I usually plan for an overnight rise. You can make this dough 24 hours in advance by letting the dough rise in the fridge.
     
  3. Transfer the dough to a floured work surface. Divide into 3 equal portions. Take one portion of dough and gather 4 corners to the center to create 4 folds. Turn seam side down and roll into an even ball. Repeat with remaining portions. Let dough rest, covered, until soft and pliable, about 1 hour.
     
  4. You’re now ready to shape the ball into your pizza. It’s tempting to start spinning the dough overhead and tossing it into the air. Resist the temptation. In my experience, it usually ends with a face (and kitchen) full of excess flour. Instead gently pull the edges evenly, using gravity to stretch the dough out into the desired shape. Be careful not to rip the dough.
     
  5. Preheat your oven to 450 degrees. Get out a 9” cast iron skillet and press the dough into the pan. Load up the dough with your favorite sauces and toppings. Brush a little olive oil around the edge of the dough. Bake your creation in the oven for 15-20 minutes, checking it occasionally for bubbles.
     
  6. Remove from the oven when the crust is nicely browned and the center of the pizza is cooked.
Time Posted: May 25, 2016 at 2:44 PM
Kelly Irelan
 
May 18, 2016 | Kelly Irelan

Smoked Salmon & Dill Tartine paired with our 2015 REX HILL Rosé

Spring is my favorite season of the year, and I’m going to celebrate the longer and warmer days by saying #yeswayrosé. I encourage you to drink pink this season with the my favorite REX HILL wine, the 2015 REX HILL Pinot Noir Rosé. This 100% REX HILL Estate Vineyard grown Rosé is crisp and well-balanced with notes of strawberries, figs and rose petal jam.

For effortless entertaining, pair this wine with easy to eat and finger friendly bites, like Smoked Salmon & Dill Tartine. 

Smoked Salmon & Dill Tartine:

  • Toasted bread
  • Layer of fresh chèvre
  • Layer of smoked salmon
  • Sprinkle of coarse sea salt
  • Fresh dill & shaved radish to garnish

 

Time Posted: May 18, 2016 at 10:51 AM
Ryan Collins
 
May 6, 2016 | Ryan Collins

The effects of water on tannin levels in grape development - Part four: How does this help us understand dry farmed sites?

In February I had the pleasure of speaking at the Oregon Wine Industry Symposium on a panel talking about grape and wine tannins. Anna Matzinger, Steve Price and I wanted to clarify what tannins are, how their levels in wine affect texture and structure of the wine, where tannins come from, the role of soil moisture on grape tannin levels and how harvest date affects quality of tannins.

I was tasked with talking about the relationship between soil water status and grape tannin levels. It was a great opportunity to improve my understanding of the relationship, and helped me come to terms with the difference between dry farming here in the Willamette Valley and the irrigated vineyards in Southern Oregon. On dry farmed sites factors like soil type, depth and texture, along with the seasonal rainfall have a profound effect on tannin level. In vineyards where there isn’t enough soil moisture to sustain the vines for the entire season, supplementary irrigation is needed. In those vineyards you have more control over the tannin levels of the grapes. To understand this topic and prep for my panel discussion, I studied three key disciplines: 1) soil science; 2) plant physiology; and 3) irrigation management.

Before I get into this I will say that I think the Internet is great for researching topics but I really like books.

PART FOUR: HOW DOES THIS HELP US UNDERSTAND DRY FARMED SITES?

Now that you understand how soil science, plant physiology & irrigation affect grape growing, how will this help us understand dry farmed sites?

  1. Sites with deep soils and high PAW, like those on the valley floor, never have enough stress to restrict shoot growth or berry size. They end up producing huge canopies with high amounts of shading and large berries that lack concentration of phenolic compounds.
  2. In years where we have low summer rainfall and the shoot tips stop growing before veraison we can confidently predict that the tannin and anthocyanin levels will be higher than average. Subsequent wine quality will also be higher than average.
  3. When winemakers talk about the differences in tannin structure between marine sedimentary soils and volcanic soils this could be explained more by the soil tension during the season than the mineral content of the soils.
  4. Site selection trumps winemaking every time. You can’t make great wine from deep fertile soils. 

 

 

Time Posted: May 6, 2016 at 3:15 PM